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Student Cover Art Contest Winners 2007

The East Bay Monthly’s Seventh Annual Cover Contest celebrates the work of young artists and their teachers throughout the East Bay. Kyra Baldwin’s “Untitled” oil pastel is showcased on the cover this month, capturing the essence of a “non-conformist” boy in her freshman art class.

It’s been years since school budgets have routinely included salaries for art teachers. Often, it’s dedicated parents who organize auctions and other fundraisers to raise money for art classes at our public schools; other times, it’s parents who volunteer to teach art in the classrooms. However it’s done, The Monthly and co-sponsor Blick Art Materials applaud the commitment to the arts that yields talent shown by the young artists published this month. We appreciate the teachers and administrators who make art education a priority for all children.

The pieces from winners and honorable mentions will be displayed in the windows of East Bay businesses this month as part of the nonprofit Kids Paint the Town project. For more information on the project, see “Paint the town,” below or visit www.kidspaintthetown.com.

Monthly publisher Karen Klaber will present awards to the three top and three honorable-mention winners on Sunday, October 7, 6 p.m. at Blick Art Materials, 811 University Avenue in Berkeley. Check The Monthly’s October issue for details, or contact Sarah Gaiero, Blick general manager, at (510) 486-2600.

All contest entries for next year will be exhibited at Mocha (Museum of Children’s Art) in Oakland in September 2008. For details about entering the contest, visit www.themonthly.com.

FIRST PLACE
Kyra Baldwin
Berkeley High School
Untitled
(oil pastel)

Kyra Baldwin’s oil pastel drawing of a boy in her Berkeley High art class is the winner of this year’s student artist competition.

“The kid who I was drawing was a non-conformist, you could say, and I wanted to make it look as much like him as I could,” says Baldwin, 15.

She says she captured a look of sadness and perhaps detachment in the boy, but generally finds him to be a pretty funny kid. The piece was the final project for her freshman art class.

With grandparents who are artists, Baldwin says she was exposed to art at a young age and has enjoyed it since she was a little kid. She says attending Prospect Sierra school before Berkeley High ex-posed her to a rich art curriculum.

This summer, Baldwin worked behind-the-scenes on sets for a drama camp in Berkeley called “Imagination Players.”

Baldwin also likes to cook and ride her bike around Berkeley.

SECOND PLACE
Lydia Chang
Piedmont High School
Palm Drive
(oil pastel)

Lydia Chang’s stylized landscape, “Palm Drive,” was an assignment for her school art class on celebrating Piedmont, in honor of the city’s centennial this year. Students were asked to create “a picture that represents Piedmont and what it was to me,” says Chang. “I usually walk down Palm Drive every day.”

The “Palm Drive” piece is a departure from the still lifes that Chang prefers. “I really like art. I like to work with dry media,” she explains. “And I tend to do more still lifes.”

The 16-year-old junior plans to take more art classes when she gets to college. In the meantime, she has just returned from a church youth group trip to Tijuana, where she and her peers helped teach vacation Bible school, played with orphans and helped to paint the church.

THIRD PLACE
Danielle Thiele
Piedmont High School
Candyland
(chalk pastel)

When Danielle Thiele walked into her advanced art class at Piedmont High last spring, she and her fellow students found bags and bags of candy strewn across the tables. The assignment from her art teacher was creation, not consumption—though surely both could be accomplished.

Students glued the lollipops, Jolly Ranchers, Lifesavers and other candies onto cardboard to create individual still lifes for chalk pastel drawings. (The students had to work quickly before the ants overtook the candy sculptures.)

Thiele, 17, saw that some students focused on a few pieces of candy, but she had another vision.

“I really wanted something that covered the whole page,” she explains. “I wanted to show all the colors and the shapes and the textures.”

Thiele says she drew inspiration from Rembrandt who masterfully used light and shadow in his work. Thiele says she’s spent a lot of her childhood drawing alongside her architect father while he sketched plans. She, too, likes to sketch, but she also
loves to “get messy with pastels.” The Piedmont High senior is captain of the water polo team and hopes to go to college on the East Coast.

She spent the summer working on 12 art pieces, an assignment in preparation for an advanced senior art class. Her favorite is a chalk pastel of her mother painting her nails.

HONORABLE MENTION
(check back in mid-September to see images of these as well as some of the other submissions)
Emma Fineman, Portrait (chalk pastel); Kevin Spevak, Why (oil pastel and colored pencil); Evan Yee, Taktsang (watercolor).


Alameda resident Jennifer Rogers found a way to bring color and life to empty retail storefronts and add spice to other business windows: children’s artwork. Her nonprofit Kids Paint the Town exhibits photographs, collages, crafts and other arts throughout the East Bay this month.

“So often we have to go to a museum to see art,” says Rogers. “It’s neat to see it on our everyday streets.”

Store windows in Oakland, Berkeley and Alameda will feature pieces from “Through a Child’s Eyes,” a collection of photographs taken by children, some of whom are residents of Berkeley’s Harrison House homeless shelter. Other venues will display quilts from students at Tehiya Day School; paintings from Piedmont High School students; home sculptures from Children’s Art Studio; poetry from “River of Words,” a poetry and art contest open to any child in the world, offered by former Poet Laureate Robert Hass and writer Pamela Michael (find it at www.riverofwords.org); and wood-collage homes created by first-graders at Prospect Sierra School. The project also includes winning entries from The East Bay Monthly’s student artist
competition. For store-window locations, go to www.kidspaintthetown.com.

“It’s a way to make a difference,” says Rogers. “Sometimes we feel like it has to be so big, but small things like this can add up to bring the community together.”


(510) 814-8127
www.kidspaintthetown.com

 

 

Kyra Baldwin

FIRST PLACE
Kyra Baldwin
Berkeley High School
Untitled (oil pastel)

 

Lydia Chang

SECOND PLACE
Lydia Chang
Piedmont High School
Palm Drive (oil pastel)

 

Danielle Thiele

THIRD PLACE
Danielle Thiele
Piedmont High School
Candyland (chalk pastel)

 

Honorable Mentions


Emma Fineman, Portrait (chalk pastel)

 


Kevin Spevak, Why? (oil pastel and colored pencil)

 

Evan Yee, Taktsang (watercolor)

 

Art Director's Picks

Here are some other entries that caught the eye of Monthly Art Director Andreas Jones:

Zweng
Diana Zheng, Piedmont High School, Reflection (water color)

Davis Lawrence Davis, Piedmont High School, Industrialization (linoleum print)

 

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